Navigation on the Missouri River

Like the Mississippi River, the Missouri River has also been highly altered to float large barges. The structures on the Missouri River, however, are harder to see unless you know what to look for. While the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) used both locks, dams, and river training structures to create an artificial barge channel…

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Upper Mississippi River Lock and Dam System

Floating huge barges on the majority of the rivers in the U.S. is not natural. It requires massive river-altering infrastructure. No where is there more of this infrastructure than on what the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) calls the Upper Mississippi River System. This system covers the upper part of the Mississippi River from…

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Navigation’s Impact on River Management

The U.S. Corps of Engineers has been responsible for “developing” the Mississippi River Basin’s rivers since the early 1800s when Congress directed them to do surveys and remove snags within the river channel. Navigation Mission To improve navigation safety and efficiency by the 1860s the Corps of Engineers was blasting out river rapids at several locations…

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Missouri’s Floodplains

The Missouri Coalition for the Environment (MCE) has been working to preserve the natural value of Missouri’s floodplains for over 40 years. Lawsuits filed by MCE resulted in a consent agreement forcing the Corps of Engineers to regulate navigable waters up primary tributaries to the ordinary high water mark. MCE was critical in the effort…

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Missouri’s Floodplains

Wetlands: Nature’s Secret for Filtering and Storing Water

Wetlands are semi-permanently to permanently water-saturated lands that vary uniquely based on local hydrology, climate, geology, and vegetation. They act as natural filters and sponges to cleanse, store, and gradually release water into our streams, rivers, and reservoirs and are as productive as rain forests and coral reefs. Once feared as a source of disease,…

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Operable Unit-3 Background

Operable Unit-3 Background The creation of Operable Unit-3 (OU-3) was announced in 2017 to further investigate radioactive groundwater contamination beneath the landfill. Only a few groundwater samples collected in the mid-1990s found Radium exceeding the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for drinking water. The EPA required new groundwater samples collected in 2012-2014 in order to freshen…

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Operable Unit-3 Background