Take Action Against CAFOs

Who can you call about animal manure in the creek? What can you do about a bill that will make it easier for factory farms to move into your county? How can you advocate for your local, independent farmers who don’t get a fair market share because CAFOs dominate production? Being an advocate for Missourians…

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Take Action Against CAFOs

MCE’s On the Move

We are excited to announce that we have moved back to the Loop at 725 Kingsland Ave., Suite 100, St. Louis, MO 63130! This is a return to a neighborhood that we had been in for many years. The new space will allow us to better connect with the community to accomplish our mission.  The…

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MCE’s On the Move

The History Behind MCE

Fifty-two years ago, Missouri Coalition for the Environment (MCE) began working in St. Louis as the region’s first independent citizens’ group. MCE’s work was born through the St. Louis Conference on the Environment at the Missouri Botanical Garden, which connected a group of like-minded individuals who all aimed to protect the environment. MCE addresses a…

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The History Behind MCE

What’s Old, Is New Again

The Missouri Coalition for the Environment (MCE) has undertaken an enormous amount of work over the past 52 years. In one of our early correspondences to potential supporters, Leo Drey (one of MCE’s founders) mentioned how our state needed a Paul Revere organization to sound the alarm on emerging issues. The people of Missouri would…

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What’s Old, Is New Again

CAFOs Continue to Claim Federal Conservation Funds

MCE’s federal partners at the National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition (NSAC) posted a blog on the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) that shows that more than 11% of program funds – $134 million – went to concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) in 2020. Federal conservation dollars going to CAFOs? MCE has a problem with this.  Farm…

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Why Is the Missouri Coalition for the Environment Talking About Immigration?

Today, the majority of hired farmworkers in the United States are foreign-born (USDA Economic Research Service). The category “foreign-born” includes authorized immigrants, immigrants who have become American citizens, undocumented immigrants and temporary migrant workers. It is no coincidence that so many U.S. farmworkers come from other countries, but can be seen as the result of…

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